News

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga, Clouded Leopard Captain

1 August 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga, Clouded Leopard (Neofelis diardi) Captain, IUCN: Vulnerably Threatened

Clouded Leopard Wanicare 2017
As part of a huge confiscation in late November 2015 Captain arrived as a young cub of about 3 months old. The only explanation is that the young Captain was poached from the wild, under the eyes of the mother since young Clouded Leopards are close to their mother. What happened to her is not clear, but we fear for the worst scenario. After a couple of months in quarantine Captain moved to a larger, outside enclosure which gives him some space to move around, although is limited and not ideal. Since he has spent almost his complete life with humans, first the traders, and of course later our keepers, he is relatively tame and this blocks a return to the wild.

Captain is an example of many animals in rescue centers these days: Healthy and strong, but without a place to go he is stuck. A return to the wild will be very hard, it’s highly doubtful whether he will survive because he lacks the skills he should have learned in his first years. Rehabilitation programs are inexistent and we as relatively small organisation do not have the means, money or facilities for a complete rehabilitation and release process for just one individual.
As we are focussing on many species we come to the conclusion that we cannot do so much for Captain as an individual. In the mean time we try to give him the best care with lots of enrichment and we are working on a larger permanent sanctuary where is welfare is guaranteed, in Cikananga or elsewhere.


In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.
Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the –very often- tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife: http://www.wanicare.com/how-to-help/donations

Photo: Jonathan J-Dawg Beilby

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Siamang Black

28 July 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Black, Siamang (Symphalangus syndactylus) IUCN: Threatened

Siamang Wanicare 2017

Siamang Black was handed over from a private zoo, and it was horrible and sad sight when he arrived in Cikananga: With his body completely covered in scabies the itch was so overwhelming he had no nails to scratch anymore. Also his canines were cut and as this denies him from eating some of his natural diet, so a return to the wild in Sumatra is simply impossible. There they suffer from habitat loss and poaching for the illegal pet trade… Luckily after his trauma Black recovered very good and today he is doing very well.

For animals like Black we provide a permanent sanctuary with various types of enrichment and of course professional medical care. We are very happy to improve the enrichment standards over the years and with the help of some experienced organisations and individuals we offer animals like Black physical and mental distraction and challenges in the form of nutritional supplements, climbing and swinging structures, toys, different enclosure furniture and much more. And did you know that black is easily the loudest animal of Cikananga? Male Siamangs call with a voice that reaches up to 113 decibel, and that’s well over the average human pain threshold… Keep a distance!

The dodo’s video about Dancing Macaques

27 Juli 2017 – The dodo shared a video about dancing Macaques on the streets of Jakarta. In the past years many of them spend time with us in Cikananga to socialize and rehabilitate after years of horrible suffering. We are very happy with the work Jakarta Animal Aid Network (JAAN) to ban the “Topeng Monyet” of the streets of Jakarta, and now other cities follow.

Let’s get these magnificent animals back to the wild, where the belong! Click on the picture to play on Facebook:

Macaques Jaan Wanicare Cikananga

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Amazing

26 July 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Amazing, Sunda slow loris (Nycticebus coucang) IUCN: Vulnerable and also in Cikananaga: Javan Slow Lorises (Nycticebus javanicus) IUCN: Critically Endangered

Slowlorisses wanicare cikananga Wanicare clinic

There are many Slow lorrises in Cikanaga from Java and Sumatra. In the last years large numbers arrived in Cikananga, and often the scenes were very disturbing: Boxes full of lorrises where some of them already died and most others in terrible condition. Many did not make the first weeks because they simply could not recover from the trauma.

Poachers and traders simply get as much as possible, and don’t care that a fair percentage dies in agony. Especially the Javan Species is very much in trouble because of shrinking habitats and hunting for the illegal trade. They are categorised as Critically endangered. The peak in trade was sparked by YouTube video’s that showed lorrises being “cute” as people tickle them, but the reality is that although to the uninformed eye it looks cute, these slow lorrises are terrified and hold their defence pose. To be clear: Slow lorrises are impossible to keep as a pet.

To “make them pets” poacher often cut their teeth. Many slow lorrises in Cikananga have this problem, like Amazing. It keeps them from a return to the wild as they are not able to eat the diet they can find in their habitat. In the meanwhile we provide a permanent sanctuary for them and we work on releases for the ones that are physically fit with other organizations. We are very happy that with the help of a sponsor we realized spacious enclosures in the last year. This facilitates the rehabilitation process for the releasable individuals as well guarantee animal welfare for the ones that stay in Cikananga.

Photo by Jonathan Beilby

In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.

Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the –very often-  tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife: http://www.wanicare.com/how-to-help/donations

 

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Gerald, Indian Muntjak

22 July 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Gerald, Indian Muntjak, (Muntiacus muntjak) IUCN: Least concerned

 

Deer Wanicare 2017

 

Also known as the Red Muntjak or the Barking Deer this individual, Gerald arrived in 2015. Not much in know about his background but the good thing is that we know more about his future, and that’s maybe even more important. Gerald is part of a release program in the south-west of Java: The Cikepuh Reserve.

Like many habitats, this area has suffered much in the last decades from deforestation, hunting and grazing from cattle, but with new efforts to restore and protect this reserve we plan releases for different animals in the coming months. That makes us happy, as well the animals involved like Gerald. Of course we will inform you when the releases start.

In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.

Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the –very often- tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife: http://www.wanicare.com/how-to-help/donations

Photo by Jonathan J-Dawg Beilby

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Foo-foo, Western Tarsier

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Foo-foo, a Western Tarsier (Cephalopachus bancanus) IUCN status: Vunerable
Arguably one of the most exceptional looking animals in Cikananga, the Western Tarsiers (also known as Horsfield’s Tarsier) are not exceptional in the illegal trade. As they are very delicate not many survive the stress of being poached, handled by humans and all the stress that come with it. Foo-foo was part of a large confiscation in early 2015 from an illegal trader with many other animals that were heading for destinations in Europa, Russia and the Middle-East. Today she is doing fine and she is healthy.
Tarsier june17
These Tarsiers live on Sumatra and Kalimantan, are active in the night and are vertical clingers. To give them the space Tarsiers deserve we were helped by a sponsor to realize a rather large enclosure, with the inside covered with net to protect their delicate bodies. Moving them back to the place of origin would be our goal, but their delicate physics make such a trip challenging. At least now they are save, in a good enclosure and under the supervision of professional medical staff.

In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the -very often- tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife:
http://www.wanicare.com/how-to-help/donations

Photo by: Roel Jansen

Photo update Leopard Enclosure

17 Juli 2017 – A snap shot of the Leopard Rehabilitation enclosure we are building with in partnership with FOUR PAWS. After the Idul Fitri national holiday the work is resumed and we are very happy to see the development of the huge spacious enclosures! #SavetheJavanLeopard

Wanicare Cikananga Update july Leopards (634x640)

Animals of Cikananga: Femi, Sumatran orang-utan

16 July 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Femi, Sumatran orang-utan (Pongo abelii) IUCN status: Critically Endangered

Femi was caught from the wild before she was 6 months old, most likely her mother was shot in front of her eyes. We can be pretty sure about this considering young Orang-utans stay directly with the mother at this age, and the mother will protect her child at all costs. This terrible trauma becomes more absurd as she was shipped to Java: Femi was found in a post-parcel at a bus station when travellers noticed the package moving. After opening Femi was found… This only shows how horrible the trade is, and makes clear why getting a Orang-utan as a pet is cruel for so many reasons.

Orang Utan Baby Wanicare 2017

As the Habitats of Orang-utans are getting smaller, due to palm oil, logging, mining and other human activities both Sumatran and Borneo’s Orang-utans as categorised as Critically endangered. Recent studies show that the prospects aren’t good: 10,000 Orang-utans at Borneo live in areas earmarked for oil palm production, if these areas are converted to oil palm plantations without changes in current practices, most of these 10,000 individuals will be destroyed and the steep population decline is likely to continue according to researchers of the University of Queensland.

Rescue work like we do helps, but of course will not solve the overall problem. Without protection of the habitats and the efforts to stop hunt for Orang-utans that end up in the illegal trade the future of the Orang-utan’s is on the line. Luckily there are also positive developments, like for instance on Sumatra where Femi belongs.

We are working on moving Femi back to Sumatra, together with Rosie who arrived in Cikananga shortly after her. There they will be in a specialized rehabilitation center for young Orang-utans, and if all goes well Femi and Rosie will return to the wild after a long rehabilitation process. Before all the paper work is done for trans location we provide Femi and Rosie the best possible care we can offer. We take them outside twice a day so Femi and Rosie can develop climbing an nesting skills high up the in trees. Considering their troubled past they are doing very well.

In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.

Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the –very often-  tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife: www.wanicare.com/donate

Animals of Cikananga: Mini, Crested serpent eagle

14 July 2017 – Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Mini, Crested serpent eagle (Slipornis cheela) IUCN status: Not-threatened

Straight form the trade: Mini is a very vocal Eagle that was probably taken from the nest by poachers. It’s a type of habituated behaviour that we see with a lot of animals from the trade after there was human contact in a very early stage of their life. Different from eagles that have lived free in the wild, Mini adapted to much to a captive life with humans influences. Happily we can offer Mini a relatively spacious enclosure that we realized last year. There we can keep the human interaction relatively low, and hope that her habituated behaviour changes so we can start the rehabilitation process.

Raptor Wanicare 2017

Crested serpent eagles are considered not-threatened and therefor almost nothing is under taken for this species to protect them. So we find more and more of this species in the illegal trade. Not only does this indicate that the this species could become threatened later in time, but the we are deeply worried about the many individual Crested serpent eagles that are victim of poachers, traders and private owners that handle and keep them in terrible ways.

For the eagles from the illegal trade the Cikananga Wildlife Center and Wanicare started the Raptor Release Program. This program aims to take care of traded raptors, rehabilitate, release and monitor after release. We have been successfully releasing raptors in the past years and more release are coming up in the coming period. More info: http://www.wanicare.com/our-projects/raptor-release-program

Foto by Jonathan Beilby

In the July and August of this year we share a series of photo’s we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this series we hope to give some insights and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia.

Of course, we also hope to raise some extra attention to the work we do for the animals, the –very often-  tragic situations and hope to find some help, financially or otherwise. Please like, share, tag and tell your friends, and help us save the wildlife: www.wanicare.com/donate

The #animalsofCikananga photo series starts

12 July 2017 – In the coming weeks we are sharing pictures in a series we call #AnimalsofCikananga. With this photo’s we hope to give some insight and backgrounds on the rescued animals that are here in Cikananga and are so typical for the many challenges wild animals face in Indonesia. Please follow our Facebook page or Instagram account for frequent updates.

Today in #AnimalsofCikananga: Eloid, Heck’s Macaque (Macaca Hecki) CITES: Vulnerable

Eloid is one of three Hecki’s in Cikananga and they all came from a large confiscation from a illegal trader that planned to sell them on the black market.

These macaques are not very wide spread as other macaque species; They only live in the northern part of Sulawesi. Since 1994 they are categorised a “Vulnerable” following deforestation, poaching and hunting by farmers who consider them crop raiders. As there is not much research done for this species not many specifics are clear, but the decline of the population is real, and the research that is available estimates a drop of 30% in the the coming 40 years.

After a stressful time in the illegal trade, Eliod is doing well in Cikananga. They get the care they deserve, diverse food and enrichement and the prospects are pretty good for Eliod and the two other Hecki’s: Currently we are working on the paperwork and then they can be moved back to Sulawesi, where the rehabilitation process starts. With a little bit of luck Eliod and the 2 other Hecki’s will return to the wild in the coming years….

Want to help Eliod? Please help us: http://www.wanicare.com/how-to-help/donations

Photo by Jonathan Beilby

Hecki wanicare 2017